Friday, November 15, 2013

After the Freeze

We've had a hard freeze for the last couple of nights.  There go the cannas!  And the crinum lilies.  And the bush lantanas.  :(

The roses are a mixed bunch.  Some are dropping their leaves, going into dormancy.  Others didn't seem to be affected by the cold (yet).  But I know their blooming days are numbered for this year.

It's interesting to see what's still in bloom even after a freeze.  These blooms made it through this time, but they won't be here for much longer:

clematis


James Galway


Julia Child
everyone remarks on her fabulous fragrance!

Madame Berkeley

Oakleaf hydrangea
Just as beautiful as any bloom

But there are other blooms that are just now arriving:

Possumhaw holly is spreading cheer with its bright winter berries.

Possumhaw Holly

And I'm always anxious to see the blooms of the camellias.

Camellia 'Hana Jiman'


Camellia 'Cleopatra'

Winter is slowly arriving.  But that's o.k.  There's still beauty to be found in the garden.

I'm joining May Dreams Gardens for Garden Bloggers Bloom Day.


59 comments:

  1. Still some lovely little reasons to be cheerful ! How precious these last few blooms are. Strange how the roses react to the cold in such different ways. Mine are the same, some still blooming and others fast asleep, leafless and flowerless.

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    1. I was surprised to see how differently they all reacted. Not at all what I was expecting, really!

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  2. Quite a resilient selection of blooms there, and they all still look pristine despite the freeze.

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    1. Don't they? Some look terrible, but the ones that look good, really look good!

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  3. This November GBBD is especially fascinating for me, since it pretty much marks the end of outdoor GBBD participation for me until March. Love your Rose photos, Holly, but oh my--I'm especially envious regarding the Camellias! One of these years, I'm going to try to grow Camellias outdoors during the summer in a pot and bring them into our sunroom for the winter! I LOVE Camellias.

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    1. Oh, do give it a try! I think it would be worth the valiant effort! I love camellias, too.

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  4. Your garden remains beautiful after the freeze. Your roses look better than mine ever do, even after coming through a frost. I love Julia Child, wonderful color.

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    1. I don't have Julia in a very good spot - she gets too much shade, and I need to move her. But people walk past her on the way to my front door, and everyone remarks on her, so I've just let her stay there, and suffer.

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  5. Okay....Holley...super stupid question...how long with the roses flower...they don't seem phased by the freeze...also, it's bloom day....

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    1. Some are, some aren't. They have certainly gone dormant, though, and no new buds will be forming. This is the end of the roses for me this year.

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  6. Okay....so the bloom day comment wasn't good as well, cause I see you there...

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  7. Roses are gorgeous as usual Holley :) Your Camellias are gorgeous. Hana Jiman - wow! I hope you get a bit longer out of your blooms before they all go to sleep. Happy Bloom Day :)

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    1. I always miss the roses when they're gone, but having camellias blooming when that happens softens the blow. And then, in the spring, when the camellias stop blooming, the roses begin again!

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  8. Beautiful are the photos!
    Greetings from Holland, RW & SK


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  9. Hi Holley, I am surprised that so many blooms in your garden survived the frost! How great it that? So nice that you get to enjoy them a little longer. Your camellia flowers are so gorgeous. Each year I am looking forward to the blooms of my two camellia bushes as well. I planted them into the ground, I think by the end of last year, and this is their first flush with the feet in unconfined territory. I am anxious to see how this will affect their flowers. Will they be bigger, will there be more? Mine is a late flowering variety, so I still have to wait for a while before these questions get answered ;-).
    Christina

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    1. I bet they will appreciate having their roots being able to spread out. I hope you get both more and bigger blooms!

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  10. Are these rose photos of before the frost? They are still wonderful! And your Camellias, so beautiful!

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    1. After the frost. It was a hunt to find them, but these were still looking good! I imagine this will be the end of them, though.

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  11. Beautiful colors that a freeze will bring. I think this bout was long enough for the color but not too long for much damage. Hey, it's going to be 80 here on Sunday. Dressing in layers and sunscreen.

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  12. Indeed there is beauty to be found. Do the camellias make it through repeated frosts?

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    1. Occasionally a hard freeze will damage some of the blooms, but the buds will continue to open. Frosts don't usually seem to harm them.

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  13. The oakleaf hydrangea is fab and I love the yellow rose, it's such a pretty colour. Lovely shots of all the residents in your garden.

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    1. I am quite proud of the oakleaf hydrangea. Mine seems to be growing very slowly, but I can't wait until it's a nice big specimen!

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  14. Wonderful roses! Your roses make me so 'jealous'... I really love roses

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    1. The love of roses is something we have in common! :)

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  15. Que preciosidad me encantan todas las flores son magicas.Las fotografias trasmiten, son geniales. Felicidades por tu bloc ha sido todo un regalo el visitarlo, espero que visites el mio y si te gusta espero que te hagas seguidora.
    Elracodeldetall.blogspot.com

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    1. The last two photos of the camellias are my favorite now, too. I just love to see them beginning to open just as the other flowers start to fade away.

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  16. Julia Child is one of my favs, too. Broadleaf evergreens are a saving grace in the southern garden; Camellia blooms on some of them are icing on the cake. Two of my best views from the kitchen window right now are Belinda's Dream roses blooming against a toasted canna plant and a blackened hydrangea with great poms of dried mophead blooms that stand out.

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    1. Love those hydrangea mopheads that stay all winter, too! They look so delicate, and yet really are so strong.

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  17. Oh that Oak Leaf Hydrangea knocks me out! Do you have articles in the archives that show it in bloom? I need to find a few shade loving plants for the north side of my house and am investigating this variety. I already have hydrangeas out the kazoo, but I have decided I can never have enough. The Julia Child rose is stunning, new to me. Happy day.

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    1. I don't think any of the oakleaf hydrangea blooms made my blog this year. Mine's still fairly new, but I recommend it! :)

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  18. It's always sad to say good bye to the summer flowers. But thankfully there is winter color to look forward to. I'm sure your sasanqua camellias will give you a nice long bloom time and before you know it spring will be here again! I especially like the possumhaw holly...just perfect for this time of year!

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    1. You're right. Before we know it, the winter will be gone - just like summer and autumn flew by!

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  19. I love what you have in bloom. Those winter berries would look so nice with some holly or cedar sprays.
    Instant Christmas decor!
    P.S. I'm still frost free here in Houston, but it was a close call. Conroe had its first frost just 40 miles north of here. Yipes! I need to get my greenhouse in gear!
    David/:0)

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    1. Oh, David! I'm so jealous you have greenhouse! I MUST get one!

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  20. You do have a number of great things still blooming. That is not the case here. It will be many months before the flowers are doing their thing again here on the shores of Lake Michigan. Thanks for sharing the photos. Jack

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    1. Ah, but you have the Lake to look at - and nothing could be more beautiful!

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  21. Freeze or not, beautiful blooms.

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    1. I know these will be the last for the year. It's sad to see them go.

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  22. It’s always lovely to see the autumn flowering camellias on your blog, and every year I think to myself I need to get one! Mine is a spring flowering and it is a long wait for it to start flowering. We haven’t had any frost yet, but might get some next week. That won’t stop my roses completely though, most of them will still go on producing the odd flower through the winter. The clematises will be gone after a few night frost though.
    Happy GBBD!

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    1. I do enjoy the fall blooming clematises. It seems they start blooming just as everything goes dormant. Such a wonderful surprise!

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  23. I am surprised at the number of lovely roses that survived your first freeze! Here, autumn is quickly passing away with the breeze; but winter has its own type of beauty.

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    1. I agree - winter can be quite beautiful. I've learned to appreciate the subtle beauty of each season.

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  24. Amazing to see so much blooming after a freeze....my roses were gone after our freeze.

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    1. So sorry. :( I have a few evergreen roses, so even when I don't have blooms, I can still enjoy the leaves.

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  25. It is always a joy to see what has survived the frost, like an unexpected gift.

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    1. Yes. An unexpected gift. So right you are! :)

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  26. Your garden seems to be embracing the changing of the seasons with grace and plenty of beauty. I love your oak leaf hydrangea, I've still not worked out where I can put one here.

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    1. Oh, you work things about *before* purchasing?!! :)

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  27. My James Galloway you are a handsome one!

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    1. Isn't he? :) One of my first roses - and I'm still so very pleased with him!

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  28. Beautiful flowers and berries.

    You know, I've been interested in growing Possumhaw (Ilex decidua) but I was under the impression it preferred moist areas (although plenty of sources say it is nicely drought tolerant). What have been your experiences in regard to heat and drought tolerance?

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    1. I just love my possumhaw. It was planted by the birds - a wonderful gift - and it is planted next to a declining oak in our lawn. So, it does get some shade from the West sun, and it also gets watered from our sprinkler system. I do think that they are fairly drought tolerant, though, as even a sprinkler system couldn't do much for the trees during our long drought in 2011. It definitely takes heat well! It is one of those plants that I just don't really notice much until it drops its leaves to reveal those fabulous berries! I think you should give one a try - I fall in love with mine all over again every autumn.

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  29. Your roses are so beautiful! I love the Oakleaf hydrangea. I was contemplating planting one however I'm not sure if our soil is too alkaline and don't know if it could handle the heat - we live in SA, TX. It sure looks pretty with the fall color though.

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    1. Steph, it should be able to handle your heat, but the alkaline soil it may not like so much. You can always throw some sulfur in the planting hole to make it a bit more acidic. As long as the soil is fairly neutral, it should do well for you. Once you have the soil amended, it should let you know (by the leaves) when you need to add a little more sulfur around it. Good luck!

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  30. I LIKE that oakleaf hydrangea. I saw on the news that your state got hit pretty hard. Today in N.E. Florida, we had a record 83 degrees.

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  31. I'm always surprised by how long into winter my roses keep flowering. There aren't as many but they become even more precious! I love that oak leaf hydrangea too! I already have three hydrangeas and don't really need another... but... it's so lovely...!

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